Thursday 19 November 2020 | 3:00pm

Lara Feigel & Amanda Craig

Thursday 19 November 2020 | 3:00pm

Lara Feigel & Amanda Craig

£5.00 - Single event ticket
£25.00 - Festival Pass

Lara Feigel has given The Group a makeover and Amanda Craig has taken the premise of Strangers on a Train and made it her own in The Golden Rule. A fascinating discussion where they reflect on the process of writing.

In conversation with Alex Clark, writer and beloved Festival chair

Lara Feigel & Amanda Craig: Reading & Rewriting the Classics

The 1950s produced some iconic novels. Key amongst them are The Group by Mary McCarthy and Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith. As it happens, both have recently been re-written by contemporary authors: Lara Feigel has given The Group a makeover and Amanda Craig has taken the premise of Strangers on a Train and made it her own in The Golden Rule. They talk to Alex Clark about the process of rewriting, and about what inspired them about these books in particular. 

Author Biographies

A writer, critic and cultural historian teaching in the English department at King’s College London, Lara Feigel is the author of four non-fiction books including The Love-Charm of BombsThe Bitter Taste of Victory and, most recently, Free Woman, a book where Lara examines her own life alongside Doris Lessing’s to explore what freedom (sexual, psychological, political) might be and whether it’s attainable or desirable. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, writes regularly for the Guardian and lives in Kensal Rise, London, with her two children. 

Amanda Craig is a British novelist, short-story writer and critic. Born in South Africa, she grew up in Italy, where her parents worked for the UN. Amanda was educated in the UK, finishing her studies at Clare College, Cambridge. After a brief time in advertising and PR, she became a journalist for newspapers such as the Sunday TimesObserverDaily Telegraph and Independent, winning both the Young Journalist of the Year and the Catherine Pakenham Award. She was the children’s critic for the Independent on Sunday and The Times. She still reviews children’s books for the New Statesman, and literary fiction for the Observer, but is mostly a full-time novelist. Her novel Hearts and Minds was longlisted for the Baileys Prize for Women’s Fiction.